Emotional Support Dog Viciously Attacks a Delta Airlines Passenger

Emotional Support Dog Viciously Attacks a Delta Airlines Passenger

A man is suing Delta Air Lines and one of its passengers after being mauled by an emotional support dog on a flight in 2017. Should ES animals be required to have a “passport” for traveling?

Coming Soon
Total Votes : 9

Scroll down to see how people across America voted.

Marlin Jackson is suffering “extensive facial damage” with lacerations to his nose and mouth after he was viciously attacked by an emotional support dog on a flight in 2017. Jackson states that he bled so extensively that “the entire row of seats had to be removed from the airplane.” He filed a lawsuit against Delta airlines recently at Georgia’s State Court of Fulton County.

According to the lawsuit, the flight took place in June of 2017, flying from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport to San Diego International Airport. Ronald Mundy is a military veteran who was a fellow passenger who sat in the middle seat, and according to Jackson, there was a 50 lb dog sitting in Mundy’s lap, which goes against Delta’s policy, as it requires large support dogs to be secured on the floor. The lawsuit states, “Defendant Delta allowed the large animal to remain in Defendant Mundy’s lap while Delta employees passed through the area in open disregard of said policy.”

Jackson asked Mundy twice if the dog was safe. Once as he was sitting, and the second time after he had buckled his seatbelt while the dog was growling. Then, without warning the dog began to viciously attack his face, and even after he was pulled from Jackson, the dog lunged again, pinning him to the window. The lawsuit states that Jackson required 28 stitches and experienced extensive emotional distress after the attack.

His lawyers, J. Ross Masey and Graham Roberts gave a joint statement to NBC News affirming that the attack, “would not have happened had Delta enforced their own pre-existing policies concerning animals in the cabin.”

The attack is following an 84 percent increase of service dog incidents within the airline from 2016. A Delta spokesperson said the company was not willing to comment on the incident, but that the company has made new changes to support its service dog policy, focusing on “safety first.” The first change being that they will not allow support/service dogs on flights longer than eight hours. Second, they will not allow support/service dogs under four months old onboard, they will no longer allow pit bulls, and will require a “confirmation of animal training” form for service dogs to be allowed onboard.

Delta’s new policies on ES animals could potentially offer peace of mind for passengers who must sit next to a person with an ES animal, yet, some may find that the changes are not strict enough and would want the animals to have a passport, which not only would require a certificate of training, but an extensive background history.

Jackson is currently seeking damages in an amount to yet be determined by the court.


Here’s how people on the Zip app are weighing in on this all over the country!

A man is suing Delta Air Lines and one of its passengers after being mauled by an emotional support dog on a flight in 2017. Should ES animals be required to have a “passport” for traveling?

Totals
70% Love that idea
30% Will never fly
Males
65% Love that idea
35% Will never fly
Females
81% Love that idea
19% Will never fly

Love that idea

Will never fly


Download the Anonymous App Now!

Open the Zip App
Download on the App Store
Android App on Google Play
Microsoft Download Center