Selfie Seat Idea Begs the Question of Mental Health and Stability

Selfie Seat Idea Begs the Question of Mental Health and Stability

There’s a new proposal out to install “selfie seats” at popular tourist destinations around Ireland. Do we need this?

Coming Soon
Total Votes : 3

Scroll down to see how people across America voted.

A picture is worth a thousand words. Taking the perfect picture, however, should not come at the expense of safety. The selfie has become a global phenomenon since the introduction of smartphones, and in 2013, the word “selfie” was added to the Oxford English Dictionary.

According to Lonely Planet, the Minister for Mental Health and Older People in Ireland Jim Daly has suggested that “selfie seats” should be installed at popular tourist attractions to create a safe selfie environment. Over the years, selfies have not just garnered praise but also a fair amount of criticism following multiple tragic selfie incidents around the world.

It seems that more people are continually putting their lives at risk to take selfies at the edge of a cliff, at the top of a skyscraper, under water or at any other hazardous location. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reported that there have been 259 selfie-related deaths from Oct. 2011 – Nov. 2017 over the span of 137 separate incidents. NCBI also reported that the average age of those victims were 22.9 years of age, and 72.5 percent of all the victims were male.

Is narcissism to blame for the lack of caution among some individuals aged 18 to 24? Young people are repeatedly risking their lives to take the perfect self-portrait. According to Psychology Today, Jesse Fox and Margaret C. Rooney of the Ohio School of Communication conducted a study in 2014 that consisted of 1,000 male subjects. The objective was to see whether posting self-portraits relates to narcissistic or psychopathic behavior. The study concluded that men with narcissistic traits were more likely to boast with selfies.

Another portion of the study talked about individuals experiencing self-objectification when taking selfies. Men who edited their photos more often were seen as self-objectifiers. The study also talked about how this objectification trait might be more associated with women. However, the study consisted of a small sample size, so the results were not definite.

Since that time, more studies on selfie-taking women have been conducted, and some of those statistics are featured on Infogram. It shows that 1 million selfies are taken each day and that 77 percent of women in college have shared their selfies with other individuals over Snapchat. Another statistic on the website also shows that 13 percent of women alter their selfies.

The bottom line is that the selfie has become a popular research topic. When taking the perfect self-portrait becomes a dangerous undertaking, it’s bound to draw attention.

Read more about the selfie seats here.


Here’s how people on the Zip app are weighing in on this all over the country!

There’s a new proposal out to install “selfie seats” at popular tourist destinations around Ireland. Do we need this?

Totals
16% No, outrageous
84% No, outrageous
Males
18% No, outrageous
82% No, outrageous
Females
13% No, outrageous
87% No, outrageous

Omg, necessary

No, outrageous


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