Oxford Dictionary Wants Teens to Slang It Up

Oxford Dictionary Wants Teens to Slang It Up

The Oxford English Dictionary is calling all kids and teens to help contribute and define teenage slang. Is the use of slang ruining the English language?

Coming Soon
Total Votes : 25

Scroll down to see how people across America voted.

Step aside Urban Dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary is about to get just as hip.

Language is important. It is also constantly changing over time. That’s why the Oxford English Dictionary is working to keep up with the times and spice it up a little.

“Lit”, “rando,” “hangry,” you name it. These are probably just some of the words that the Oxford English Dictionary is looking to incorporate into their world of definitions. In fact, according to Dazed, the organization has launched an appeal to get teenagers to help with “particularly elusive” youth slang and jargon.

The Oxford English Dictionary notes that the colorful language used by children, teenagers and young adults has indeed been tricky to track down and define. Its goals are to “record all distinctive words that shape the language, old and new, formal and informal.”

Young people can be a part of this movement by sending in examples of recent slang words they know through the Oxford English Dictionary website or on Twitter with the hashtag #youthslangappeal.

Senior editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, Fiona McPherson revealed that, “there’s something particularly innovative and elusive about the way that young people adapt existing vocabulary to make new words, and in doing so create what seems like a secret lexicon to those not in the know.” Interesting.

Some terms that the dictionary is currently exploring are “dank” (meaning “cool or great”) and “hench” (defined as “fit and muscular”).

The Oxford English Dictionary is so set on figuring out teen language, that state schools in the UK are offered free access to the online version for this academic year.

On Twitter, the Oxford Dictionary tweeted, “How sick* is the OED? Deliver a rejuvenating dose by contributing a word to our latest appeal, this time focusing on the language of children and the youth. We could do with some help. Bare help. #YouthSlangAppeal.”

Some may argue that proper English language may soon go away, with all the use of so many slang terms. It seems there’s a new slang term someone is using every day, and it can be pretty hard to keep up. After all, are some of them even real words? At least, now we can look them up in the dictionary.

As the OED is calling on children and teens to spice up its terms and definitions, do you think slang’s harmful to the English language? Read more about the story on Dazed here.


Here’s how people on the Zip app are weighing in on this all over the country!

The Oxford English Dictionary is calling all kids and teens to help contribute and define teenage slang. Is the use of slang ruining the English language?

Totals
76% Y – Nothing “lit” about it
24% N – Fosters creative minds
Males
74% Y – Nothing “lit” about it
26% N – Fosters creative minds
Females
81% Y – Nothing “lit” about it
19% N – Fosters creative minds

Y – Nothing “lit” about it

N – Fosters creative minds

Oxford Dictionary Wants Teens to Slang It Up


Download the Anonymous App Now!

Open the Zip App
Download on the App Store
Android App on Google Play
Microsoft Download Center